Face prints


#1

im amazed at the print quality. im saddened by the rate of failures im getting. the one good thing is i know the reason for the failures, how to prevent it is another story…
basically the ear’s on this model have made it fail twice, the first time was my fault, the way it was oriented to print gave no support on the ear overhangs, the second time though I did reorient it to give the ears support, but the support didnt print on the second one! ugh… this resin is too expensive for this failure rate :expressionless:

anyway here’s a couple images with a quick blast of black spraypaint.


#2

For a model that size, you might want to thicken the supports if you’re not doing that already.  Also following form’s suggestions to print at an angle has done well for me.  I’ve only had one part fail out of 20, and I knew I was taking a risk because part of the model was red in preform.


#3

I wouldn’t call those a “failure”. I would call it Art!. Those look awesome :wink:


#4

I agree,  They may not be the desired results but they look great to me.


#5

Hi guys (and girls), been lurking for awhile but decided to chime in today.

Why not shell that part? Would it require internal supports? For example in 3dsmax you could make an internal shell, set an ID override so you can select the internal faces by material ID, then relax and deform (FFD) as needed to address any self intersection. Sometimes I will hide all the original external faces and delete internal areas that do not shell nicely, like the ears, nostrils. Then cap the open borders and relax locally with soft selection. May take 30 minutes but should reduce your resin consumption considerably.

I’ll do it for you if you want to send me the geometry.

-Shea


#6

I was going to shell it, but it would need internal supports also, so i just got lazy and went for it as is.

I actually kind of like these prints even though they did fail…


#7

here’s one that came out nice, just decided to cut off the problem parts for now!


#8

What a great face - it’s amazingly naturalistic.

I would recommend keeping a sharp eye out for overhangs in your design after you generate parts, reorienting the model, and possibly increasing support density.

+1 for shelling - you’ll save yourself a good deal of resin, and if you’re goal is to paint the model, no one will know the difference :slight_smile:


#9

I just wanted to thank you guys for the suggestions, increasing the support density did the trick, printed out a perfect little bust!


#10

Here’s a new one I sculpted and printed this week. pretty much love this machine…


#11

I love those! & yeah without shelling they must use up alot of resin! I’m curious what software you model with?


#12

Thanks Vince, I primarily use zbrush.

this last one I spent the time to shell it, it took some figuring out but eventually found a good method. I also needed to add support structures manually inside the shell.


#13

Very good looking Stephen.  If you have time send me a message so we can discuss your use in using zBrush, which I have used for game characters, but not with the Form 1 yet.  Would like to hear some tips & tricks.