Solvent recycling process

Just thought I would post this here for users interested in seeing what the solvent recycling process is like.

This is on our Uniram solvent recycler.

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That’s pretty cool but it seems you could buy over 1300 litres of IPA (probably quite a bit more with bulk discount) just for the outlay of the machine, before running costs - how long does it take to process 20L of IPA? I guess it may make sense if an extremely heavy user?!

For our setup it has paid itself off already, is more convenient to use, and is also better for the environment, so it’s win win all around. For other companies it might work out differently.

  • Because we have a really small space, we don’t have the space to store hundreds of liters of IPA, thus we don’t really get any significant bulk discounts. Because we run a Form 3 and Form 3L, we change IPA at least 3-4 times a year, and require 2x20L buckets of new IPA each time. Here in Vancouver, Canada, these go for around $200 CAD each (We use MG Chemicals 99.9% iso for electronics cleaning). That’s around $1600 per year just to swap out IPA.
  • We previously were being “responsible” and paying a waste treatment facility to take the IPA, which also cost something like $50 per container, so this is another $200 per year
  • We then found out that most waste treatment facilities here don’t do any recycling, they just burn it which sounds terrible for the environment
  • We got a deal on the recycler and paid around $4000 CAD for it so it pays itself off in two years
  • I will say also that the added convenience of not having to mess around with solvent disposal, storage of large amounts of IPA and procurement of new IPA is pretty awesome. I do still need to buy new IPA once in a while to account for evaporation, but that’s mostly due to the poor design of the smaller Form Wash stations
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